Global Governance: How a Global Society Could be Led

Timothy J. Sinclair's Global Governance is part of a wider series by publisher Polity. Each book examines a concept in the social sciences: other titles include Freedom and Democracy. Fittingly enough, the series is called Key Concepts. I'm not inclined to bother with many of the other texts at this stage, although one exception might … Continue reading Global Governance: How a Global Society Could be Led

Luke Martell’s The Sociology of Globalization

About a month ago, I finished the above book. The previous one was written by a sociologist but wasn't a sociological book necessarily, but this one is. More specifically, it examines globalization through subjects that sociology has an interest in. What it does is select different sociological areas and use this focus to examine globalisation, … Continue reading Luke Martell’s The Sociology of Globalization

Back to Basics: Ritzer on Globalisation

So yesterday I finished another of the books on my Sociology list. This was a book by George Ritzer called Globalization: A Basic Text. This is the second book by Ritzer that I've read and both are rather long and involved, wide-ranging introductions. The other was an Introduction to, like, ALL of social theory to … Continue reading Back to Basics: Ritzer on Globalisation

Global History: A short overview of A Short Overview

I read this book called Global History: A Short Overview by Noel Cowen. It's an achievement not only because it condenses many dozens of millennia into a little over 200 pages but also because of the fact that there are many dozens of millennia to have to condense in the first place. From a fairly … Continue reading Global History: A short overview of A Short Overview

Social Theory as a Renegade Student

I got a first wave of sociology books late last year and finally finished the last of them over Christmas. The books are as follows: Social theory in the real world by Steven MilesThinking Sociologically by Zygmunt Bauman and Tim MayThe Sociological Quest by Evan WillisIntroducing Social Theory by Pip Jones and Liz BradburySociological Theory … Continue reading Social Theory as a Renegade Student

Thoughts on Fathers and Sons, Chapters I-XI

Turgenev's Fathers and Sons involves the following characters: Nikolai Petrovich, barin (literally master) of the estate Marino; Paul Petrovich, his bachelor brother, a retired soldier; Arkady, Nikolai's son, a recent graduate; Bazarov, his friend and fellow graduate; and Thenichka, Nikolai's young wife (about the same age as the graduates), to whom he's been married just … Continue reading Thoughts on Fathers and Sons, Chapters I-XI

Introducing Turgenev (and Russia before the Bolsheviks)

I started reading Fathers and Sons today. It's a novel by Ivan Turgenev, published in 1862. The introduction reminded me that I must learn more about nineteenth century Russia, or pre-Bolshevik Russia more generally. It said that they abandoned serfdom in that century and that Turgenev, though associated primarily with the left, had some sort … Continue reading Introducing Turgenev (and Russia before the Bolsheviks)